Program Leaders

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Phil Garnock-Jones (Homo sapien sapien) & a Kea (Nestor notabilis) near Arthur
February 25, 2012

Kea (Nestor notabilis) are the world's only alpine parrot. The kea diverged from it's close relative the kaka (Nestor meridionalis) appromxately 5-3 million year ago coinciding with the formation of the Southern Alps and the corresponding niche expansion (Wright 2008). The kea and kaka shared a 'proto-kaka' ancestor which had diverged from the kakapo (Strigops habroptila) approximately 65 million years prior. (more...)

tags: Biogeography of New Zealand, Conservation Biology, Arthurs Pass

location: Arthur's Pass, Canterbury, New Zealand

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Emergent Rimu in a Nothofagus Forest, Bradshaw Sound; Fiordland, NZ
January 4, 2012

January 4th, 2012: The mountains of Fiordland are dominated by silver beech (Nothofagus menziesii) and black beech (Nothofagus solandri). The nothofagus forests are found throughout the South Island and around the Pacifc Rim suggesting the genus arose in Gondwana. In this image an endemic Rimu (Dacrydium cupressinum) is emerging from the canopy. Rimu, a podocarp, has traditionally been used for it's hardwood by Maori. (more...)

tags: Biogeography of New Zealand, Conservation Biology, Field trip Fiordland/Doubtful Sound

location: Southland, New Zealand

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Westerly View off the bow of the Navigator in the Bradshaw Sound; Fiordland, NZ
January 3, 2012

January 4th, 2012: Fiordland, a world heritage site, was sculpted by glaciers during the last glacial Ice Age in New Zealand, approximately 20,000 years ago. The glaciers formed steep U-shaped valleys that have thus been flooded with both salt and fresh water. Parts of the fiords have depths exceeding 440m indicative of the glacial ice penetrating below sea level. (more...)

tags: Biogeography of New Zealand, Field trip Fiordland/Doubtful Sound

location: Southland, New Zealand

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