Program Leaders

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Blue Ducks (Whio)
March 18, 2012

The Whio (common name: Blue Duck; Scientific name: Hymenolaimus malacorhynchos) are endemic to New Zealand and is the only species in its genus. There are only about 2,500 whio left in the wild, which puts its population lower than the kiwi and its status as one of the most endangered birds in the world. They are specifically adapted to survive in fast-flowing rivers with high quality water and are perfectly camouflaged to the river environment. (more...)

tags: Mt Bruce

location: Kaiparoro, Manawatu Wanganui, New Zealand

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The Toheroa
January 12, 2012

The Toheroa (Paphies ventricosa) are large bivalves that are endemic to New Zealand and are found burrowed up to 20 cm deep on flat, fine sandy beaches exposed to the surf between the low and high tide levels. Due to both commercial and recreational harvesting of the toheroa, their numbers declined drastically from the late 1800s to 1989 when New Zealand banned all fishing of the prized bivalve. Today, only the local Maori have rights to harvest toheroa through the use of permits. (more...)

tags: Biogeography of New Zealand, Conservation Biology, Field trip Catlins/Otago Peninsula

location: Port Chalmers, Otago, New Zealand

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The Carpet Shark
January 12, 2012

The Pekapeka (Cephaloscyllium isabellum) or more commonly called the carpet shark is a small nocturnal benthic shark endemic to New Zealand and resides mostly at depths less than 400 meters. The carpet shark is oviparous (egg laying) and the egg cases are laid in pairs anchored to objects on the sea floor by tendrils. It is not commercially farmed but instead usually caught as bycatch by trawling and rock lobster fisheries. (more...)

tags: Biogeography of New Zealand, Conservation Biology, Field trip Catlins/Otago Peninsula

location: Port Chalmers, Otago, New Zealand

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